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Shoot: Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam

GP01MIN
Greenpeace is projecting the short film "Sloop Opera" on the chemical tanker 'Gerd' (the ship was later renamed 'Tulip')in the port of Amsterdam. This film shows the consequences of ship breaking on the beaches of Asia. The ship contains toxic substances like asbestos and heavy metals. Greenpeace strongly suspects the ship has been sold - again - to ship breakers.

On 10 April 2002, the 'Gerd', under Norwegian flag, arrived in Amsterdam and was detained because its Norwegian owners 'KS Venus' were in debt.
On June 27, the ship was sold to the Liberian 'Advanced Distribution Company Limited', a company based in Monrovia, Liberia. The ship was sold for USD 750,000 a price below its market value in scrap on the same day.
Immediately after the sale of this ship at auction rumours spread that the company was planning to send the ship to India for scrapping. The buyer withdrew its offer after Greenpeace asked for an inventory of hazardous materials and announced it was tracking the ship. The 'Gerd' was to be auctioned again on 5 September 2002, but that same week it became clear the ship had already been sold. According to tips at the Greenpeace shipbreaking website the ship was bought again by the Liberian registered company Advanced Distribution Company Limited. The Amsterdam Port Authority confirms this. The lawyer of the court and the new owner will not give a reaction.

According to Fairplay the ship was sold 12th of July 2002 by a company named Flarom to unknown Indian/Bangladeshi breakers for USD 770.000. Greenpeace asked new owner(s) of the ship to ensure that all toxic materials will be removed from the ship before scrap.
The new owner renamed the ship 'Tulip'. It now sails the flag of St. Vincent instead of a Norwegian flag. Whether the ship will be kept in service or immediately brought for scrapping to a shipbreaking yard, still remains unclear. Unfortunately these obscure practices are very common in the shipping industry. There is no duty to report when a ship is sailing off for scrap to a shipbreaking yard. The ship owners prefer to keep such information confidential. The export of waste is regulated in (international) treaties and legislation. Recently the Dutch 'Raad van State' (the highest Court in the Netherlands) decided that ships-for-scrap are subject to these same rules. Ships sent for scrap who contain toxic substances like asbestos and PCBs are toxic waste are not allowed to exported to developing countries.

Every year, hundreds of ships like the 'Gerd/Tulip' are sent to scrap yards in Asia. This number is set to increase dramatically over the next few years because single hull oil tankers will be obsolete by 2015. These ships contain lots of toxic waste like asbestos and heavy metals. During scrapping these toxic substances are released into the environment. Asbestos fibres float in the air. Oil and other toxic substances are released directly into the sea. The working conditions of the shipbreaking workers are very bad. In countries like India, Bangladesh and Pakistan they dismantle these ships without any protective clothing.

A look into the future: eventually the 'Tulip' was scrapped in Alang, India, in May 2003.
Before scrapping she was owned by Balfour Maritime in Liberia.

Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
18 Jul, 2002
Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
18 Jul, 2002
Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
18 Jul, 2002
Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
18 Jul, 2002
Projection Action on Tanker in Amsterdam
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